Moera News
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Moera News & Thoughts

Learn more about Moera Decentralized Social Network: https://moera.org
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Moera News changed group name to «Moera News»
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Moera overview completed. Enjoy: http://moera.org/overview/
See complete instructions about setting up the Moera development environment: http://moera.org/development/setup/index.html

Also, in every project there is README.md file containing installation instructions for this particular component.
I was asked many times, why to create a new decentralized social network, why not to use an existing one or another? I thought about that, and I can write about each one of them why I think the solution Moera proposes is better. But there is more besides that. Success has many components. Even if the idea is not fairly new, but we implement it the best way, deliver it to customers, make it robust, easy to use, prove it is better than centralized alternatives, motivate users to switch to it, then we didn't waste our effort.
Started to document the Moera protocols. Shortly about the cryptography that is used and encoding of the data being signed.
Vitalik Buterin tells about how his views on privacy changed in recent years:

"I'm considerably more pro-privacy than I was a few years ago. A few years ago, my position was closer to "in a well-running society it's probably optimal that everyone sees everything, the value for privacy tech for ordinary people is (i) to let them buy weed, put up beds so people can sleep over in offices, and otherwise circumvent silly regulations, and (ii) to maintain a healthy balance of power, because even if more transparency is good, the government only having the all-seeing eye and everyone else being in the dark would give too much power to the government".

Things that changed my mind, and made me believe that even in a hypothetical perfectly equal and fair society people having some privacy is a good idea include:

Reading Robin Hanson and others' literature on signalling, and seeing just how large a portion of our lives it still is. Basically, I see privacy as a way to prevent signalling concerns from encompassing all of our activity, and creating spheres where we are free to optimize for our own happiness and just our own happiness, and not what other people think about us.

Having a deeper understanding of the ways that it's possible to make other people's lives suck even as a law-abiding private citizen, and realizing that privacy is an important self-defense tool for those situations.

Realizing more deeply that "the people" are not always virtuous, and that social pressure as a mechanism for influencing people's behavior doesn't always lead to results I approve of (see: recent string of internet mobs leading to people getting fired for political views). Realizing how bad mainstream media is even today, which makes me more understanding of people's desire to protect themselves from them.

Mass surveillance is problematic because (i) I don't trust governments and large corporations to have interests that are aligned with us, and (ii) it creates points of centralized data collection that could get hacked, leading to everyone getting that data even if that was never the original intention. That said, in the physical space it's pretty unavoidable, so we should at least work hard to make the internet a more privacy-preserving place."
Discussion group added to the channel. Welcome to @MoeraTalk!
Update: Discussion group switched to Public.
A lawyer for Facebook argued in court Wednesday that the social media site’s users “have no expectation of privacy.”

According to Law360, Facebook attorney Orin Snyder made the comment while defending the company against a class-action lawsuit over the Cambridge Analytica scandal.

“There is no invasion of privacy at all, because there is no privacy,” Snyder said.
User's timeline in the Web UI (work in progress).

Note the URL in the address bar. There is no page number in the URL, "before=" parameter instead points to a moment in time. If new posts are added, the content of the page will not change, because it shows a fixed period of time.

It's a usual problem with forums - you look for a post in a forum, the search engine gives you a link, you go to the forum... but the post is not there, because new posts were added and all the previous posts were moved to next pages. We try to prevent this from happening in Moera. On the other side, the pages will not always contain exactly the same number of posts. But who cares?
The first publicly accessible Moera naming server is now located at http://naming.moera.org/. It can be used for testing and development, so you don't need to run your own naming server. Moera node and client are now using this server by default.

The naming server does not use a blockchain yet for storing names. It is using a local PostgreSQL database, so there is no decentralization for naming servers for now. But the protocol supports seamless migration to a blockchain at any moment. Implementation of the blockchain for naming is not my top priority at this moment, all development efforts are concentrated around making publication and social features working.

I plan to publish other services (client, browser extension, demo node) soon. The goal is to make a working online demo for Moera that a regular user may play with.
https://client.moera.org/ is now up and running. Moera web client releases will be published there. The browser extension was changed to use https://client.moera.org/releases/latest by default, so you can try Moera without configuring it.

The current release of the client (v0.1.0) is already published.
New features of the latest node/client release were added to Node API documentation: creating and viewing postings, viewing the timeline.
Moera browser extension for Chrome v0.1.0 passed verification and now available in Chrome Web Store. Download and install at https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/moera/endpkknmpgamhhlojbgifimfcleeeghb.